Register new Account

Go back

A password will be e-mailed to you.

Badges

50 Languages Available

Chose one second language, select your level and download the badged.

Push one Badge to find more information about the badge

If you don´t know how show your badges, go to our Displayers.

1. Choose the language you know

2. Choose badges category

Level

Six levels of foreign language proficiency

The CEFR describes foreign language proficiency at six levels: A1 and A2, B1 and B2, C1 and C2. It also defines three ‘plus’ levels (A2+, B1+, B2+). Based on empirical research and widespread consultation, this scheme makes it possible to compare tests and examinations across languages and national boundaries. It also provides a basis for recognising language qualifications and thus facilitating educational and occupational mobility.

Teacher

Six levels of foreign language proficiency

The CEFR describes foreign language proficiency at six levels: A1 and A2, B1 and B2, C1 and C2. It also defines three ‘plus’ levels (A2+, B1+, B2+). Based on empirical research and widespread consultation, this scheme makes it possible to compare tests and examinations across languages and national boundaries. It also provides a basis for recognising language qualifications and thus facilitating educational and occupational mobility.

Vocabulary

Los inventarios de Nociones generales y de Nociones específicas se presentan en los Niveles de referencia para el español como los constituyentes del componente nocional, centrado en las especificaciones de contenidos que tienen que ver, en sentido amplio, con el significado.

Approximate amount of words you know at each level:
A1: 908
A2: 1040
B1: 2.564
B2: 4384
C1: 4.978
C2: 4.902

Interaction

Oral production is developed sequentially in terms of the kinds of texts that are produced by the learner, i.e., from simple messages such as a salutation to discourse that involves coherent and cohesive thought, which is present in such texts as oral presentations or speeches. Oral texts can be of at least four different types: prepared or spontaneous, interactive or noninteractive. Each kind of text type takes time to develop in the second language classroom and requires different teaching strategies in order to ensure this development.

Interactive oral texts involve at least two or more people who are engaged actively in dialogue with one another. This type of discourse is often typified by spontaneous speech or unprepared speech, such as conversations or informal debates.

Listening

Listening comprehension is often referred to as a receptive skill where the word “receptive” takes on the connotation of passivity. Rather, listening is an active process which entails the use of cognitive strategies such as guessing, clumping together known material so as to attend to the unknown, recognizing linguistic and semantic patterns, and using one’s past experiences to anticipate contextual elements.

The purpose of listening, then, is twofold: 1) to participate in discourse and 2) to obtain information; i.e., listening serves a need or a purpose. Thus, the kinds of activities and tasks that are used to develop this skill must represent this need to listen, while involving both the problem-solving and information-getting processes.

Reading

Reading comprehension is a receptive skill, which involves the active processing of messages. Efficient readers do not only decode and decipher written symbols, but, also, and more importantly, interpret and construct meaning from these symbols. In this process, ideas, thoughts, concepts, and values are actively extrapolated and internalized by readers so as to determine the communicative intent behind the messages.

During the reading process, readers search for all kinds of clues and resort to a number of resources in order to assist them in the construction of meaning, using such strategies as, sound-symbol relationships, grammatical, semantic, contextual, and visual clues, their own experiences, and so forth, as a means of determining the meanings behind the symbols. Thus, the kinds of activities and real-life tasks that are used to develop this skill must represent the need for reading a text by employing such processes as problem-solving and information-getting.

Talking

Oral production is developed sequentially in terms of the kinds of texts that are produced by the learner, i.e., from simple messages such as a salutation to discourse that involves coherent and cohesive thought, which is present in such texts as oral presentations or speeches. Oral texts can be of at least four different types: prepared or spontaneous, interactive or noninteractive. Each kind of text type takes time to develop in the second language classroom and requires different teaching strategies in order to ensure this development.

Writing

Written production is a skill which requires ideas to be formulated and expressed as printed output. Like its oral production counterpart, written production is developed sequentially in terms of the kinds of texts to be produced by the learner; i.e., from copying and formulating simple words or phrases to create simple messages to drafting autonomous works which involve the expression of numerous thoughts in a coherent and cohesive manner such as one would find in essays or short stories.

Show badges

3. Choose your level